ACROSS THE UNIVERSE

 

I want to share information about an online international storytelling event this Friday night, May 22, 8PM Eastern Standard Time, organized by the Narrative Therapy Initiative in Massachusetts. Per NTI’s website,

“For 24 continuous hours, NTI will be hosting small group conversations that span the globe.  We have invited hosts for each hour who are inviting guests they value and would like to have people know about.  The hosts are inviting their guests to share some small story about something meaningful to them at this time.  These conversations will allow the rest of us to be introduced to people we wouldn’t otherwise get to know.  The opportunity to make new relationships and grow new communities is the purpose of this initiative.”

The conversations are meant to be recorded and accessible after the fact. The NTI announcement notes that, due to its violent history, English won’t be privileged and participants may choose the language most comfortable to them. More here.

 

Viva la historia!

 

BEHOLDER AND BEHELD

 

 

Scilla is having its moment, and as ever, it mesmerizes me like Ruth Wilcox’s skirt trailing among the flowers and grasses in “Howard’s End.” This photo does it no justice. Blossoms that were electric to my eye are overpowered here by stalks and leaves. Still, if I squint, there’s a hint of Van Gogh’s irises, so that’s something. It’s been raining a lot, and I’ve been reading Patricia DeYoung’s fine book on chronic shame, which she defines and explores in, I think, extraordinarily clear and detailed interpersonal terms. It’s a book written for clinicians, but full of observations that I wish could be wider spread. It’s an especially interesting read for me at this time of quarantine. While many of us are looking forward to being with others again—mingling and enjoying contact—for some, the self-other encounter is one of private chagrin. Healing from shame requires safety, and safety requires attention to connection and disconnection, a commitment to emotional being-with. Perhaps all our current contact through phone calls and screens could be seen as an opportunity to fine-tune our awareness of voices and faces. There’s so much information there—sometimes subtle, but sometimes as vivid as indigo and ultraviolet, hovering above the plainer stems of speech. The more attention we give, the more we perceive.

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