LITTLE PLANET

 

 

I was walking home from the farmers’ market one sunny Saturday morning when I happened upon this little moss orb, brightening first the sidewalk and then my palm, where it rolled in soft perfection. It made me feel unaccountably happy, and boy, did I need that joy. I sat on the stoop, admiring it for a while. Fast forward a couple weeks: a teen client wanted a crafty project and settled on teaching me how to make pom-poms. The yarn in the staff closet was a yellow-flecked green. After assiduously wrapping it around the tines of a fork, binding it off, sliding it free, and snipping loops all around, I held a fabricated replica, not stunning, but in the moment exciting enough that I reached for my phone to share this photo. Said teen appeared unimpressed. Even with the plants on my sill and the trees across the road, nature often feels a world away when I’m in my office. Its fluorescing brightness; its glowing grace. My endless need for those qualities. The silence in me that wants to exclaim.

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Out of respect for client privacy, names here are always changed or omitted, and details may be altered in fact while relevant in spirit. Text and image copyrights held by me. To subscribe and receive future posts, please look to the upper right on your computer screen, or scroll to the bottom of the page on your mobile device. I’m deeply grateful for my readers, and as always, I’d love to reach more. If you enjoyed this piece, please consider sharing it with anyone you feel might like it, too, by linking to it in whatever way works for you. I typically post once a month, so no barrage.

THE SYLPH AND THE SKY

 

When I accepted a job with a mental health agency, I had to give up the luxury, formerly afforded me, of a walking commute. I’m not someone who hates driving, but an hour a day, five days a week, is much more than I’m inclined to enjoy, especially considering environmental impacts.

Even so, I continue to feel grateful because, rather than strip malls and billboards, my route is lined with trees, a mountain view in one direction, big skies in the other. What a difference that has surely made, in the last three years, to my resilience.

I was sitting not long ago with a young teen girl. She was showing me art with a fantasy theme, scrolling through an album she had made on her phone. There were mermaids, griffins, fairies, elves, centaurs, etc, rendered in exquisite detail: manes and feathers and tails and wings.

Resting my arms on the kid-sized table in my office, I leaned in to admire each picture she shared and listen to her commentary. She was telling me in an offhand way that this was her art; she said she’d been busy all week with the drawing. “This is one of my favorites.” “This one was hard to get just right.” At one point, she swiped to a kneeling angel with double wings. “Hmm,” she said to me, with what I perceived as embarrassment, “I’m not sure why I made her naked—but you can’t see anything, so…”

She was showing me art she’d found online. I knew that, but I didn’t challenge her, just murmured admiration. And I didn’t question that choice, just noticed it, and noticed that it felt right, while wondering what various colleagues would do. When the slideshow came to an end, I said, “The world needs more magic, doesn’t it? Like the magic in you.” She fiddled with her phone. Without looking at me, she said, “Probably you say that to everyone.”

“Actually, I don’t,” I said—which is true. After a beat, I added, “Yes, I’m a counselor, and part of my job is seeing the best in people. But I don’t have to lie to do that.” She was quiet. Then she expressed interest in making art with me. As she drew, she sought to maintain her deception with remarks like, “I’m feeling too lazy to fix the nose.” “I guess I’ll leave the leg like that for now.”

My drawing, meanwhile, was abstract. I began with my non-dominant hand, a handy trick I was once taught, to quiet the critical voice, and delineated an oblong shape, with some internal contouring, vaguely resembling a seed, a flying saucer, or a cross-sectioned hard-boiled egg. Then I reached for the crayons and colored pencils.

“What are you making?” she asked.

“I don’t know,” I said, “I’m just having fun.”

Soon her paper turned over, and she, too, began making a more abstract design, scallop upon scallop. She told me, when she had finished, that it was a mermaid’s tail. And a thing of beauty it was.

I thought about her on my drive home, and our time together. Her observations of the pictures she showed me were often poetic, which is a gift of hers. A sylph perching on a mountain ledge and gazing at the sky was “trying to understand the clouds.”

Lately I’ve been leaving the radio off for the day’s-end commute. I open the windows enough for fresh air, not so much that I’m buffeted. The air rushing past fills my ears in a pleasant way, and I feel any tension in my face relax.

This girl, my client, made a meaningful choice. Really, more fabrication than deception. I believe she wants to possess the skill that she admires, to have a direct connection to a world of possibilities much grander and more colorful than she perceives in her actual life. Given what I know of that life, why would I seek to take such a dream from her? Like an imaginary friend, it will fade when she has no further need of it.

Sometimes the clouds take strange shapes. That evening, it was as if an enormous, thick, soft anvil rose up from the horizon. I drove toward it, trying to understand it.

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How is it the end of August already? I’m deeply grateful for my readers, and in 2018, I’d love to reach more. If you enjoyed this piece, please consider sharing it with anyone you feel might like it, too, by linking to it in whatever way works for you. I typically post once a month, so no barrage.

Out of respect for client privacy, names here are always changed or omitted, and details may be altered in fact while relevant in spirit. Text and image copyrights held by me. To subscribe and receive future posts, please look to the upper right on your computer screen, or scroll to the bottom of the page on your mobile device. Thank you, and warm regards.

 

ALL THAT GLITTERS IS NOT GOLD

Like a human cousin of the Corvid family, I was once upon a time a child who loved anything that sparkled. Mica, tinsel, brooches on ladies’ coats. I played an angel in my second grade holiday pageant, and the gilded poster-board wings hung in my closet until after I had graduated college, when my mom tactfully asked if I wanted to keep them.

I’ve got three hunks of pyrite at home that say I haven’t entirely outgrown scintillation; but I newly hate glitter. It contributes to the microplastics polluting the planet’s water and species. Many in the profession of Youth & Family Therapy espouse the making of glitter bottles as coping tools, and until recently, I was more repelled by the larger, more obvious plastic involved. Now it’s the razzle-dazzle that concerns me most. It’s the bellies of seabirds and fish that matter to me. Our health isn’t separate from theirs.

I know what it’s like to grow up in tight financial circumstances and feel a fervent longing for anything that seems to bespeak prosperity and success. I still feel some reflexive awe when recalling a cardboard crown with convincing paper gems that I could glue on where I chose. I remember the power of certain aspirational goods: name-brand sneakers, clothing, toys, and even snacks.

One of the harder parts of my job, though, is swallowing my environmental dismay to meet kids where they’re at, including acknowledging their sadness and/or excitement over things all too likely made by other kids halfway around the world. My concern is—has to be—the emotional hunger that makes conspicuous consumption so much more appealing. But sometimes I feel, as I listen, an ache for the larger world, of which my lead-free, plastic-free, glitter-free office is just one, infinitesimal part.

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I’m deeply grateful for my readers, and in 2018, I’d love to reach more! If you enjoyed this piece, please consider sharing it with anyone you feel might like it, too, by linking to it in whatever way works for you. I typically post once a month, so no barrage.

Out of respect for client privacy, names here are always changed or omitted, and details may be altered in fact while relevant in spirit. Text and image copyrights held by me. To subscribe and receive future posts, please look to the upper right on your computer screen, or scroll to the bottom of the page on your mobile device. Thank you, and best wishes.