PRIDE

Ectoplasmic rainbow

“Did you tell your counselor what you said to me in the car?”

“No,” said Mercedes, with a smirk followed by a giggle.

“You should tell her!” her mom exclaimed.

“No, you tell her!”

“You don’t want to tell her?”

“No, I want to hear you.”

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Mercedes had come to services as a high-strung nine-year-old with separation anxiety. After eight months’ worth of escapades designed to develop her confidence, she was ten years old and seemed pretty near ready to command the universe. (Our fast-slow games and yarn telegraph in the hallway provided unintended ancillary outcomes in the smiles of amused and bemused colleagues passing by.)

As her parents described it to me, they had felt hostage to their daughter’s need for constant reassurance. She’d required accompaniment to her classroom each morning and a detailed outline in her planner regarding who would pick her up after school, when, and how. Her mother included a cheering note in Mercedes’s packed lunch each day. Mercedes couldn’t be left home alone for even a handful of minutes. Breaches of protocol led to tearful fits.

All that changed, and more. I’ll try to write another time about our work, much of it disguised as silliness. Notable here is her parents’ support of their daughter’s therapeutic homework, and Mercedes’s willingness to engage in same. More than anything I did, that made the difference. Deep breathing practice was added to her bedtime routine, along with a recitation of three things that made her happy. Three things every night without fail, that was the only rule—they could repeat or vary endlessly, and be substantial, like visiting grandparents, or lighter, like an extra-yummy breakfast.

Notable also, on the part of her parents, was their extraordinary ability to identify and celebrate positive change. Too many parents with whom I’ve worked have goal posts that constantly recede, such that nothing their kids do is ever enough. As an adult, I find that approach profoundly disheartening; how much worse must their kids feel? When Mercedes volunteered to take half the grocery list and split off from her dad in the store to find things—one of the early positive signs—the confidence and independence she expressed got the recognition they deserved. Blessings upon you, parents of Mercedes!

My inspiration to write about this family this particular week, however, came from another form of recognition, during our last visit. First, I presented Mercedes with the book of skills and stories she had created bit by bit. In the back, there was a letter from me. When we met, she’d chosen a skeleton key from a set of images, as the one representing something about what had brought her to counseling. “I hope when I’m done, I’ll have the key to my worries,” she’d said. Ceremonially, I presented her with an actual skeleton key, which I’d chosen the summer before from a tool chest at a flea market, with an inkling that it would serve a purpose someday.

In reviewing her accomplishments to date, Mercedes’s mom mentioned forgetting a note in the usual packed lunch; it wasn’t, to her surprise, the end of the world. A ruined batch of birthday cupcakes had Mercedes reassuring her mom, “It’s not worth getting upset about.” She could enter school by herself, and take the bus in the afternoon, looking after herself at home for an hour or two. She even seemed to enjoy her time alone. But the most striking detail shared that day, for me, had to do with her seemingly growing assertion of selfhood.

So what had happened in the car? Apparently her mom had made some reference to Mercedes growing up, how one day she’d be bringing boys home and taking her dad to a whole new level of stress. And apparently Mercedes had rejoined from the back seat, “What if I like girls?”

Mercedes giggled again, hearing me hear it.

“And what did I say?” asked her mom. Her lovely, fond, invested, teasing, caring, and committed mom, who had gamely partaken of all our adventures, including holding an end of red yarn while her daughter backed away unrolling the ball of it. “Are you still there?” I encouraged her to ask her mom every step or so, tugging the telegraph line, while her mother answered, “Still here,” tugging in reply. Eventually Mercedes rounded a corner and kept up an unspoken communication—out of sight, on her own, but still connected. We talked afterward about the metaphor of that—how our invisible connection to those we love might look, if we could see it, like that red yarn. Securely held while giving and receiving.

About her daughter possibly being gay, her mother turned the beam of her smile from Mercedes to me and back: “I told her that would be just fine with us.”

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Out of respect for client privacy, names are always changed. Text and image copyrights held by me. If you enjoyed this piece, please consider sharing it. To subscribe and receive future posts, please click the “Follow” button, accompanied by a plus-sign, in the lower right corner of your computer screen. Thank you for reading. I was greatly inspired, in my work with this client, by Playful Parenting and The Opposite of Worry, by Lawrence J. Cohen. My deepest condolences to all who have lost their loved ones to violent crimes, including hate crimes.

2 thoughts on “PRIDE

  1. I wish my parents were like that. :’)

    I’m pansexual, young adult, dealing with anxiety disorders…yet I know I couldn’t possibly come out to my abusive and LGBTphobic religious parents. One day I want to look back and realise I’ve grown into an out and proud Queer able to provide peer support for other LGBT people with mental illness.

    I hope around the world, there will be more stories like the lovely one you’ve shared here.

    Like

    • I’m so sorry to hear that you’ve experienced an abusive environment, and that you see ideology and fear blocking the way of love and acceptance. Without hyperbole, it’s tragic, how often that’s the case. I hope that partaking of safe spaces – maybe some in the form of stories – will help you grow comfortably into the person you want to be. And/or recognize the strength in the person you already are! Thanks as always for reading.

      Liked by 1 person

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